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Caring for our Conflicts

Many activists agree that the prison industrial complex works against efforts to rehabilitate perpetrators, and undermines attempts at humane communities. When we step outside of the punitive paradigm, what resources are left to deal with conflict in circles of activists, lovers, and friends?

Modern technology has deeply changed our professional, political, and personal lives. How do these new modes of being affect the way harm is perpetrated, processed, and healed? What makes a person “toxic”? When, if ever, is exile appropriate? Is it possible to call in, as opposed to calling out?

Join us for a workshop about restorative justice principles, and an introduction to practical skills to process pain, fight oppression, and pursue justice.

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This event is happening as a part of Sustain’Alive, a weeklong event series centred on activism, society, and the planet.

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Montreal, traditional name Tiohtià:ke is located on unceded Indigenous territory. It has historically been a meeting place for many nations, with the Kanien’kehá:ka as the stewards. We encourage you to reflect on your current and historical relationship to this land.

Collective Care

What does it mean to build sustainable and holistic communities? How can we care for our whole selves—physical, mental, but also emotional and spiritual—as we organize for social justice?
How can we integrate care in the very way we function as part of our collectives and communities?
How can we transform ourselves and our social relations as we seek to transform the world around us?
How can we avoid reproducing societal oppression in our activist spaces?

Too many activists experience burnout, which in many cases is not directly linked to the amount of work but to *how* we carry out that work, to the collective dynamics and associated frustrations. This workshop will be a space to reflect upon our practices and level to which they are sustainable, and put together ideas and practices that have potential to center people and their well-being as we carry out social justice work.

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This event is happening as a part of Sustain’Alive, a weeklong event series centred on activism, society, and the planet.

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Montreal, traditional name Tiohtià:ke is located on unceeded Indigenous territory. It has historically been a meeting place for many nations, with the Kanien’kehá:ka as the stewards. We encourage you to reflect on your current and historical relationship to this land.

Cross-faculty Sustainability

This event is a cross-disciplinary touchstone opportunity for people of all areas of research and study. Sustainability can mean a multitude of things—strategies for preserving and better utilizing natural resources to work with our environment. It can also mean as economic policies that keep projects and resources going for years to come. The world of social sustainability is more and more heavily discussed in our communities, as we try to forge new ways to keep people happy, engaged, and connected.

In this event, students and researchers across faculties can come together to discuss a wide variety of questions related to this topic.

How is sustainability discussed in your faculty?
What solutions can your area of study bring to our current climate crisis?
Which sustainable initiatives exist in your field of study—at Concordia, and beyond?
What kind of sustainability initiatives do you imagine stemming from your department?
What sustainability related initiatives do you want to learn more about from your faculty?

When: Tuesday, March 12th, 2pm to 4pm
Where: EV 5.777 (Concordia Art Hives)

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This event is happening as a part of Sustain’Alive, a weeklong event series centred on activism, society, and the planet.

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Montreal, traditional name Tiohtià:ke is located on unceeded Indigenous territory. It has historically been a meeting place for many nations, with the Kanien’kehá:ka as the stewards. We encourage you to reflect on your current and historical relationship to this land.

 

Living Labs

Come join us to learn more about living labs, and how to integrate the concept into your own projects!
Living Labs are experiential learning initiatives. They are touchstones for a methodology which uses research and innovation to help students advance sustainability while learning at the same time. Research and learning are put into action through a collaborative model―students are allowed to practice the very theories they’re engaging with, and enhance their skill base at the same time.
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Students have an opportunity to bring what they are leaning in classes or research, and design projects or initiatives that make that knowledge tangible. This takes learning out of the realm of the theoretical, and into the tangible world. The end product is a meeting of knowledge and skill that can help elucidate complicated concepts into something students and their peers can interact with more easily.

Living Labs work against the ivory tower, cerebral quality of higher education to bring ideas into the world in a way that does what we’re supposed to be doing: letting people learn.

When: Monday, March 11th, 12pm to 2pm
Where: Concordia Art Hive, EV 5.777

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This event is happening as a part of Sustain’Alive, a weeklong event series centred on activism, society, and the planet.

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Montreal, traditional name Tiohtià:ke is located on unceeded Indigenous territory. It has historically been a meeting place for many nations, with the Kanien’kehá:ka as the stewards. We encourage you to reflect on your current and historical relationship to this land.

Storytelling for Campaign Organising

Interested in learning how you can incorporate storytelling into your campaign strategy?
This workshop, which was developed from the writings of union organizer Marshall Ganz, and Organize BC’s guide titled “Organizing: People, Power, Change”, will explore the power of storytelling as a tool for building momentum in community based campaigns.
Register now!

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We will be discussing the basics of organizing, why we tell stories, the key elements of an effective story, and how to build a powerful public narrative for your campaign or organization. To learn more about Organize BC and Marshall Ganz, check out these links: https://www.organizebc.ca/public-programs/organizing-people-power-change

About our facilitator: Maya is a student in political science at Concordia and is involved in many campus initiatives, including the Dish Project, the Concordia Food Coalition, and the Food Autonomy Campaign. She was first introduced to storytelling and public narrative building while organizing for a renewable energy campaign in Nelson, British Columbia (unceded Ktunaxa, Sinixt, and Syilx tmix territory), and is eager to bring this knowledge back to the Concordia community.

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This event is happening as a part of Sustain’Alive, a weeklong event series centred on activism, society, and the planet.

——

Montreal, traditional name Tiohtià:ke is located on unceeded Indigenous territory. It has historically been a meeting place for many nations, with the Kanien’kehá:ka as the stewards. We encourage you to reflect on your current and historical relationship to this land.

 

Sustainability Mixer 6.0

Come meet, learn and talk about all the different sustainable goings-on at Concordia!
The Sustainability Mixer 6.0 is an opportunity to get to know and become involved with established and emerging sustainability initiatives taking place on and around campus.
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Groups from a variety of angles of sustainability, be it social, economic or environmental, will be there to represent and discuss their work.

This event is a great opportunity to network around food and drinks and engage with the wide field of sustainability!

Join us from 5pm to 7pm on March 15, for an evening full of fascinating discussions, as well as complementary food and drinks!

Holistic Activist Communities

Together we can build more resilient social movements. In order to be sustainable, we need to find alternatives to call-out culture. We need to cultivate work ethics that don’t lead to physical or emotional burnout. We need to remember those who came before us, and those that have yet to be here.
Come join us for a vibrant conversation through prefigurative politics, collective memory and thinking of our movements as ecosystems. By having these kinds of conversations, we can carry each other into more caring futures.
Reserve your spot!

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About our facilitators:

Jen Gobby organizes with Climate Justice Montreal and is also a PhD candidate at McGill. She has spent the last 4 years doing research with the climate justice, anti-pipeline and Indigenous land defense movements to think together about how we can build more powerful movements towards decolonizing and decarbonizing Canada. She is the founder of the MudGirls Natural Building Collective, did a term in office on the local government, lived-off-the- grid for a decade and did a stint traveling with a sustainability-themed circus troupe!

Brett Cox – he/him. I’m a white, male, cis-gendered settler originally from so called ‘Brantford.’ I recently graduated from McMaster Universities’ Globalization and the Human Condition Masters’ program, and I am currently a graduate student in the Community Economic Development program offered through Concordia’s School of Community and Public Affairs. I’m an awkward dreamer, constantly pulled between being an introvert and having a love for humanity, nevertheless passionate about social justice and using my privilege to contribute to cultural disillusion and accountability amongst my circles and working in solidarity with those oppressed and marginalized. My research pursuits involve decolonization and unsettling settler-colonialism, prefigurative politics and revolutionary process, accessible community engagement, cultural disillusionment, and solidarity economy organizing; at the moment my course learning objective involves breaking down societal barriers between ‘adulthood’ and ‘youth’ in the context of radical political organizing.

When: Thursday, March 14th, 5:30pm to 8pm
Where: SCPA basement, 2149 Mackay St.

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This event is happening as a part of Sustain’Alive, a weeklong event series centred on activism, society, and the planet.

——

Montreal, traditional name Tiohtià:ke is located on unceeded Indigenous territory. It has historically been a meeting place for many nations, with the Kanien’kehá:ka as the stewards. We encourage you to reflect on your current and historical relationship to this land.

 

Ecological Grief Circle

Come join us for a circle to share fears, anxieties, grief and other related feelings regarding climate change and socio-environmental harm. Climate change is inseparable from colonialism, white supremacy, capitalism, and other forms of oppression, so discussion of climate change’s connected social harm is also welcome to this space.
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Our intentions in holding this space are: to speak from the heart, listen from the heart, and share spontaneously. When we are in a circle, what we share does not fall on any single person’s shoulders to bear- instead, it is held in the circle, witnessed, and given opportunity for release. Circles are open to everyone, a talking piece is used so that everyone gets a chance to share.

About our facilitator: Anya is a white queer, whose work is in facilitating collective gardens and workshops about permaculture. They are finishing their last year in environmental studies and are very passionate about DIY ethics, skillshares, and building community. They are also a vipassana meditator of 3 years.

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This event is happening as a part of Sustain’Alive, a weeklong event series centred on activism, society, and the planet.

——

Montreal, traditional name Tiohtià:ke is located on unceeded Indigenous territory. It has historically been a meeting place for many nations, with the Kanien’kehá:ka as the stewards. We encourage you to reflect on your current and historical relationship to this land.